Should NZ copy France and force supermarkets in giving unsold food to the needy?

Should NZ copy France and force supermarkets in giving unsold food to the needy?

When the French government announced a ban on supermarkets throwing away unsold food, New Zealand was one of a number of countries to throw in their two cents worth on the matter. NZ Listener food columnist Lauraine Jacobs weighed in on the topic when she tweeted: “C’mon NZ. It’s not rocket science. France becomes first to force all supermarkets to give unsold food to needy.” Under the new law, supermarkets in France with a footprint of 400 square metres or more must donate food no longer fit for sale to charities or for animal feed. Yet research from France’s Ministry of Ecology shows that shops are responsible for just over a tenth of the 7.1 billion tonnes of food wasted by the nation each year – 11% in fact, of which 5% comes from supermarkets. And consumers? The average French national generates 67% of those 7.1 billion tonnes, which equates to about 20-30kg of food wasted per person each year. Even more horrifying than that is how around 7kg of those 20-30kgs is food that’s still wrapped. Assuming our situation is about the same as France, shouldn’t we first be looking to unpack our own waste behaviours before we start dumping the blame on supermarkets? While there’s been no specific research into the amount of food New Zealand supermarkets waste, The Waste Management Institute of New Zealand (WasteMINZ) has done plenty to lift the lid on amount of food binned by households.  WasteMINZ estimates that the average family buys and chucks out some $563 worth of unused food each year, which amounts to 122,547 tonnes of food and costs the nation about $872 million per year.  As a consumer, I know there’s more I could...
A Word From Be Nourished Founder Jo Nolan

A Word From Be Nourished Founder Jo Nolan

Ever since the beginning of time organic, raw, unpasturised cultured living foods, such as sauerkraut, have been well-known for their powerful healing properties and as a way to nurture and foster improved gut and intestinal health. As a mother of two children, I became really interested in nutrition and was looking for ways to nourish my family to be in the best health as possible. That was how I found Sally Fallon’s amazing book Nourishing Traditions and the Weston A. Price Foundation. There was a wonderful chapter in this book on fermented foods and their great nutritional value. I thought sauerkraut maybe one of the easiest things to start with. However, I soon discovered if I wanted the benefits of an organic, raw sauerkraut made from local ingredients, I was going to have to make it myself as the only kraut I could find was imported and pasteurised – defeating the purpose as it is then a dead food. Inspired to get into the kitchen, I found that not long after starting to make and include these fermented vegetables into my family’s diet daily, things such as sugar cravings and allergies, such as hayfever, were disappearing. After quite a few years of fermenting for myself, family and friends and finding out more about the vital importance of organic, fermented foods I decided it was time to have as many people as possible be able to experience the benefits of fermented foods and so Be Nourished was born. Today, I’m committed to sharing my knowledge about the benefits of organic, fermented veges and producing nourishing cultured, living foods that are a delicious complement to...
New recipe from Renee: spiced kale chips

New recipe from Renee: spiced kale chips

Straight up… We’re going to warn you that these super-food kale babies are hugely addictive. What chips aren’t though, right? If you’re going to be scoffing bowlfuls of there crispy, salty, lightly spiced green goodies, at least munch with a zen mind as they are straight up good for you too (see ‘nutrition bite’ below). To makes sure they reach their full crunch potential, it’s really important that you lay them out on the baking paper without the leaves overlapping as you may potentially end up with a half soggy chip and there’s not much fun in that. Aside from that one side note, the good news it that they’re super easy as to make.   Spice Kale chips- Ingredients Serves 4 1 bunch of kale, large stems removed 2 tablespoons of coconut oil (soft, room temperature) 1 tablespoon of hulled tahini 1 tablespoon of lemon juice 2 tablespoons of nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon of tamari ½ teaspoon of chilli flakes ½ teaspoon of cayenne pepper ½ teaspoon of paprika ½ teaspoon of sea salt Nutrition Bite All hail the kale! Often attributed as “the queen of greens” and “a nutritional powerhouse.” But did you know, that despite being the vege en vogue, kale is actually simply a form of cabbage (albeit a wild one)?  Per calorie, kale has more iron than beef, is high in Vitamin K and is filled with powerful antioxidants. Right royally a powerhouse of goodness.  Method Preheat the oven to 160°. Line two baking trays with baking paper Rip the kale leaves into large pieces. They’ll shrink as they cook, so don’t go too small. Place...
Ooooby’s mission explained- part 2

Ooooby’s mission explained- part 2

Ooooby is on a mission to make local food convenient, affordable and fair, everywhere. These three elements are very important to us, that’s why we want to explain each part individually starting with convenience.  Last week we published our first part about Ooooby’s mission regarding convenience. This second part with address our thought about affordable food. Affordable The prices of fruit and vegetables in New Zealand have only increased in the past decade, due to a combination of weather conditions, global produce prices and supply and demand. As prices of other food stuffs like meat and bread have dropped this year, this makes adding healthy produce to the diet a bit more dear. With Ooooby we have cut down operations to the bare minimum with a nifty online platform that does a lot of the processing for us. We are constantly working on this platform, to make the coordination of planning, ordering, receiving and sending local produce as efficient as possible. This coordination has always been the main hurdle to cost-effectively distribute produce from, often smaller, local growers and producers and the reason supermarkets mainly work with wholesalers, who then of course also receive their share of the pie. But by cutting out all middlemen, buying from the growers directly and delivering to our customers at home we have made the trajectory from farm to fork as lean and flexible as possible. With this process the produce reaches the end user a whole lot faster than through a more traditional supply chain. Waste generation is also minimized because we only order exactly what we need for the week. Besides...
New recipe from Renee: watermelon, feta & mint salad

New recipe from Renee: watermelon, feta & mint salad

Especially for the warm summer days, Renee put together an unlikely combo. But when foolproof in its success and so charmingly bright, why not give it a shot? The fresh, sweet crunch of the watermelon balances the salty creaminess of the goat feta and the citrus and mint cut in to make it a simply moreish mouthful. You’ll be tickled pink. Ingredients Serves 4 3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil 200g of goat feta, cut into cubes ½ a watermelon, cut into 1 inch cubes 3 tablespoons lime juice Salt and freshly ground pepper 3 tablespoons of chopped mint leaves Method Drizzle the olive oil onto the feta and set aside Flick out any visible pips from the watermelon with a small knife Gently toss the feta and watermelon together and pour the lime juice over top Drizzle the remaining oil from the feta over top of the mix Season with salt and pepper to taste (go easy on the salt as the feta is naturally quite salty) Scatter with the chopped...
Ooooby’s mission explained – Part 1

Ooooby’s mission explained – Part 1

Ooooby is on a mission to make local food convenient, affordable and fair, everywhere. These three elements are very important to us, that’s why we want to explain each part individually starting with convenience.    There are a myriad of reasons why eating local is better for us, our communities and our ecosystem. All of these reasons drive us to work towards our mission, together with our growers and customers.  Convenient  Good local food can be quite hard to find and access.   Supermarkets by far outdo any other food outlet in dollars that are spend on food in New Zealand and it is hard to to deny their convenience for the shopper. Huge variety in products, extended opening times and many different locations make these institutions the preferred place to shop for food. However, to keep the prices low and achieve economies of scale supermarket chains buy in large, forcing small growers and suppliers to scale up or be pushed out of the market.   So what is the alternative? Farmers markets are luckily becoming more popular in New Zealand, with increasing amounts of visitors as well as stallholders, providing a wonderful forum for face-to-face contact between growers and consumers. Before the advent of the supermarket, direct markets and local grocery stores like butchers and bakers used to be the only places where food could be bought.   At Ooooby we recognize the benefits of a local food system, and have thought long and hard on how to bring this back in place. How can we make it easy again to by fruits and vegetables that are grown...