A delicious and nutritious fruit and vegetable smoothie recipe

A delicious and nutritious fruit and vegetable smoothie recipe

A great way to use fruits and vegetables is in smoothies. Not only are there lots of different recipes available, they are super easy to make, taste great and thanks to the ingredients used, are very nutritious. For your basic smoothie all you need is a cup of vegetables, a cup of fruits and a liquid base. To increase the flavour and nutritional value you can also add in protein powders, nuts, seeds, herbs and spices. Using Ooooby’s products you can create a wide variety of smoothie recipes. This deep red coloured one makes use of the following ingredients: 1/2 a frozen banana – using frozen fruits helps make smoothies thicker, giving them a milkshake like consistency, and bananas work especially well at achieving this. You probably already know that bananas are an excellent source of potassium; a medium sized one provides you with 12% of your daily requirement. They are also a good source of vitamin B6, a vitamin required for energy production. Bananas are a digestive aid, and are great to have before working out. The natural sugars that they contain help to make this smoothie more palatable. 1/2 a cup of carrots – carrots are very low in calories but are the best food source of vitamin A. In fact one medium carrot provides you with more than 200% of your daily requirement! The only other vegetable that comes close to having this amount is the sweet potato. Vitamin A promotes eye health, gives you glowing skin, provides immune support and fights inflammation. The antioxidant beta-carotene which is found in carrots is thought to inhibit the growth of cancer cells and may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes....
Should NZ copy France and force supermarkets in giving unsold food to the needy?

Should NZ copy France and force supermarkets in giving unsold food to the needy?

When the French government announced a ban on supermarkets throwing away unsold food, New Zealand was one of a number of countries to throw in their two cents worth on the matter. NZ Listener food columnist Lauraine Jacobs weighed in on the topic when she tweeted: “C’mon NZ. It’s not rocket science. France becomes first to force all supermarkets to give unsold food to needy.” Under the new law, supermarkets in France with a footprint of 400 square metres or more must donate food no longer fit for sale to charities or for animal feed. Yet research from France’s Ministry of Ecology shows that shops are responsible for just over a tenth of the 7.1 billion tonnes of food wasted by the nation each year – 11% in fact, of which 5% comes from supermarkets. And consumers? The average French national generates 67% of those 7.1 billion tonnes, which equates to about 20-30kg of food wasted per person each year. Even more horrifying than that is how around 7kg of those 20-30kgs is food that’s still wrapped. Assuming our situation is about the same as France, shouldn’t we first be looking to unpack our own waste behaviours before we start dumping the blame on supermarkets? While there’s been no specific research into the amount of food New Zealand supermarkets waste, The Waste Management Institute of New Zealand (WasteMINZ) has done plenty to lift the lid on amount of food binned by households.  WasteMINZ estimates that the average family buys and chucks out some $563 worth of unused food each year, which amounts to 122,547 tonnes of food and costs the nation about $872 million per year.  As a consumer, I know there’s more I could...
A week at Ooooby Matakana

A week at Ooooby Matakana

I am part of the Ooooby Matakana team. I love to eat out of my own back yard! We grow most of our own fruit and veggies and when there is excess I can sell to Ooooby. These broad beans were picked in the morning and in the Ooooby boxes later that same morning. I am hoping to grow tomatoes for Ooooby this summer. ~ Robin Barclay Tuesday started with a quick visit to the Auckland hub to say hello to Daphne, Leonie, Chris and Ben before jumping in the truck with Mark to take produce to the Ooooby Matakana hub for the packing day.  The mood was good humoured and relaxed, even though there were some challenges – the Ooooby crew were short staffed and some produce had not been supplied as expected. Finding local produce With Robin’s Broad Beans and Patrick and Louise’s potatoes, the boxes had a good sampling of local produce and looked great! The crew finished just in time as customers began arriving, after school pickup. Some boxes were picked up and taken to other drop points in Warkworth, Leigh and Wellsford. Behind the scenes I spent the following day with Katya, who has been finding her way in the supply coordination role and doing a great job of managing the seemingly endless variables that are inherent when it comes to finding and buying fresh produce. On Thursday I learnt about the Customer Happiness role from Mel. She is about to pass on the  role to Gabrielle, but the Matakana crew are hoping she can continue to work her magic with the Ooooby Matakana Facebook page. A growers meeting was held on Tuesday the 3rd at...
What’s in an Ooooby box?

What’s in an Ooooby box?

We get this question quite often, but the answer is not as simple as it may seem! As we offer more than one type of box in different sizes of which the contents change every week, the weight and volume of the boxes also changes weekly. With the passing seasons the boxes contain what is best to eat right now, bringing you back in touch again with the seasonality of truly local food and part of the Ooooby excitement. Also, while leafy greens add more volume but less weight to the mix, root veggies like carrots and kumara weigh more but take up less space again.  The only thing that stays constant every week however is the value of the produce you receive. Each box always holds an amount of produce to the value of that box, which simplifies your weekly food budgeting.  Each week we will let you know what is in the box with a Sneak Peek email. This allows you to request (up to three) exclusions and replacements, add additional items to your order (fresh produce or local artisan groceries) and do some meal planning in advance.  In the Auckland Ooooby hub you can choose between the Lil or Big Organic Mix Box, the Lil or Big Mix Box and the Organic Fruit and Organic Veg Box. You can also build your own Ooooby box, how that exactly works is explained in detail here.  To give you a bit of an idea and help you make the right choice for your family, here is what each box held in an average week in spring: Lil Organic Mix...
First Ooooby spuds – Matakana

First Ooooby spuds – Matakana

We wanted to share a photo with you of our first Ooooby spuds. We’ve worked all winter to convert a sheep paddock into a growing area and it’s pretty exciting to think that next week we’ll be supplying the Matakana hub with fresh dug local new potatoes.   Louise and I heard about Ooooby at the Beyond Organic NZ Tour workshop in March, then attended the Ooooby Matakana set up meetings. We just felt that Ooooby presented a really cool way to connect with the land and the local community. And that is “money can’t buy stuff” that people readily associate with. We’ve been enjoying being Ooooby packers – the Matakana team are lovely people and we have a lot of fun every Tuesday, and to be growing just adds to the mix. We are committed to seeing this Ooooby thing work.   I saw how nervous Pete was at the first investor roadshow meeting at AUT and I thought “this means a lot to this guy”. The simple act of feeling empathy for someone that is prepared to put it all out there got me thinking, “yeah, I’ll try and help this effort as much as I can”.   Like everything in life there are some commercial realities. Adam Smith’s reference to the “invisible hand” in 1776 is still very relevant today. People are innately motivated to service their own needs and by doing that they ensure the efficient allocation of resources within an economy (as if drawn by an invisible hand). Ergo, money will always find it’s best use. Ooooby like every other business has to operate within that paradigm.   In Matakana, we...
Why we’re starting an Ooooby Hub In Christchurch

Why we’re starting an Ooooby Hub In Christchurch

Fresh local organic food is found mostly at weekend Farmer’s Markets. So, Garden City 2.0 created a mid-week home delivery service that provides greater access for households craving real food, plus it gives these same growers at the market a reliable and consistent new revenue stream. Since we began, a little over two years ago, we’ve been talking with Ooooby about how they have been developing their service. Earlier this year, the team at Garden City 2.0 realised that so many of the operational processes we need for the crew, along with features we want to offer customers, have already been built into the Ooooby software and systems – so it made perfect sense to form a new partnership here in Christchurch. Ooooby is bringing advanced IT infrastructure, uber-efficient operational systems and people-friendly interface. Together with our knowledge of the local market, organic supply networks and connections with Christchurch communities, we feel this is a compelling proposition and a really positive step for our local food system!   Furthermore, we’re excited about shifting our existing packing hub into the inner city – a melting pot of innovative, community-led projects and collaboration. The purpose of this is to reveal the true nature of the food distribution and make it more accessible and interactive for the public. Fresh produce looks amazing, it’s so radiant and full of life that it really is a pleasure to be around, let alone work with. It captures people’s attention and this visibility is our most powerful engagement tool, so we want to be in a space that can host this activity and multiply the impact...