Bananas! Local?

Bananas! Local?

While the most ardent locavores might choose to not have bananas in their Ooooby box, the reality is that Kiwi’s like ’em. Did you know we import more bananas per head of population than almost any other nation (maybe something they give us that’s missing in our soil – I don’t know). So in the early days, while operating from the first Ooooby hub, a converted shipping container on an empty section in Grey Lynn, we polled our Ooooby customers to see if they wanted bananas in their boxes, and got a resounding yes! At this point in the story, it’s important to understand why we are ‘doing’ Ooooby. The food system we have come to reply on since the advent of supermarkets some 60 years ago (in NZ), has had an unintended consequence of supporting large scale monoculture, and long-distance food. As we sit here in 2016, most people get their food from an industrial and globalised food system.   Ooooby’s mission is to make local food easy and fair, everywhere. One of the first steps is to build a base of customers, so as demand increases, we can go out to the local farmers, and want-to-be local farmers, and let them know we have a channel to market for their produce – thereby increasing local production. At the moment, there is a distinct lack of local and naturally (non-chemical) fruit and vegetable production, so we need to: Build a base of satisfied customers Seek out the most local and most natural produce we can find. Building a customer base means meeting their needs and wants while paying attention to the philosophy we...
Building a new food system

Building a new food system

The ‘super market’ came on the scene in New Zealand, around 60 years ago promising diversity and an abundance of cheap produce. At that time only 54% of New Zealand households had access to a refrigerator, so most Kiwis were shopping on an ‘as needed basis’. The local butcher, greengrocer and corner dairy were the most visited shops. Tom Ah Chee built the first Foodtown supermarket in 1958 with business partners Norm Kent and John Brown. The 1,400 square metre store was opened on a 1.1-hectare site at Otahuhu and boasted 118 car-parking spaces. It proved such a success that a second Foodtown was opened in nearby Takanini, three years later. The store offered convenience, by selling meat and produce as well as other grocery items. Tom Ah Chee, had observed retailing trends in the United States and also knew that an increasing number of Kiwis had cars. He figured that if his business offered free car parking, ‘then all those cars would belong to my customers’. The rest, as they say, is history. More and bigger In Christchurch the city’s first supermarket opened in 1963. The site of Riccarton Mall is shown here in the early 1960s, as the foundations were laid. By the 2000s the mall had expanded to fill the entire block. Throughout the country local authorities began to plan for new shopping centres as suburbs grew and car ownership increased. In 2007 the Foodstuffs group accounted for around 55% of the nation’s grocery turnover. It had about 850 stores operating under the PAK’nSAVE, New World, Write Price, On the Spot and Four Square brands. Progressive Enterprises, which operated Foodtown, Woolworths, Countdown, Fresh Choice and Super Value...
How to get the Ooooby box you want

How to get the Ooooby box you want

When you sign up for Ooooby boxes, you will get access to your own Ooooby dashboard, from where you can adjust your orders 24/7. Each week that you have an Ooooby box coming, you will also be sent a “Sneak Peek” email. This will let you know what is planned for your upcoming box, what news or cool product we have on offer and finally what options you have to customise your order that week. You have several options to make sure you receive the Ooooby box that is best suited for you: 1. Do nothing and receive the box as listed in your Ooooby dashboard Every week our Supply Coordinator goes out of her or his way to plan a varied and balanced Ooooby box for each of the types we offer. Taking into account is what was in the boxes last week, and the week before, what is in season right now and good value, what will go well together to make a nice meal and ensuring a good balance between starchy, leafy and fibrous vegetables and the best in-season fruit. To take the headspace out of your produce shopping, this is your set-it-and-forget option. Just check out the box list to plan the rest of your groceries that week or don’t even look at it to be surprised every week with a box full of healthy goodness. 2. Request a swap In any given week you can swap up to three items out of your box. You can exclude items just once off, or add them to your permanent “no-thanks” list to exclude them automatically from all your boxes. We will...