A Word From Be Nourished Founder Jo Nolan

A Word From Be Nourished Founder Jo Nolan

Ever since the beginning of time organic, raw, unpasturised cultured living foods, such as sauerkraut, have been well-known for their powerful healing properties and as a way to nurture and foster improved gut and intestinal health. As a mother of two children, I became really interested in nutrition and was looking for ways to nourish my family to be in the best health as possible. That was how I found Sally Fallon’s amazing book Nourishing Traditions and the Weston A. Price Foundation. There was a wonderful chapter in this book on fermented foods and their great nutritional value. I thought sauerkraut maybe one of the easiest things to start with. However, I soon discovered if I wanted the benefits of an organic, raw sauerkraut made from local ingredients, I was going to have to make it myself as the only kraut I could find was imported and pasteurised – defeating the purpose as it is then a dead food. Inspired to get into the kitchen, I found that not long after starting to make and include these fermented vegetables into my family’s diet daily, things such as sugar cravings and allergies, such as hayfever, were disappearing. After quite a few years of fermenting for myself, family and friends and finding out more about the vital importance of organic, fermented foods I decided it was time to have as many people as possible be able to experience the benefits of fermented foods and so Be Nourished was born. Today, I’m committed to sharing my knowledge about the benefits of organic, fermented veges and producing nourishing cultured, living foods that are a delicious complement to...
More about Ooooby

More about Ooooby

We exist primarily to rebuild local food economies because we believe that changing the way we produce and distribute food is fundamental to solving the world’s most pressing social and ecological problems. The founding team is serious about putting mission before money. To this end, the founders have transferred 90% of their shares in Ooooby Ltd to the Ooooby Foundation, a not-for-profit trust with the primary purpose of rebuilding our local food systems. This way, a large proportion of profits will be channelled into supporting local food projects such as community gardens, food growing education, purchasing land for food production and funding for local food start-ups.   We connect growers to customers through an online platform which makes local food competitive with mainstream retail on both price and convenience. Our business model is to provide software and support for local teams to distribute local food to local customers. Each local hub manages logistics and transport within their region. We differ from traditional online retailers by mostly buying directly from local food producers in preference to conventional wholesalers. This means the food is typically fresher and the grower is paid more, because there are lower transport, storage and handling costs. We currently pay a minimum of 50% of retail prices to our suppliers, ensuring a viable margin for sustainability in the long term. We are able to pay fair prices to producers yet still offer competitive prices to customers because our software reduces supply chain costs by managing logistics. Along with licensing the software platform, we provide hubs with management services to assist them in opening and operating in their own...
Time to take your CSA up a notch?

Time to take your CSA up a notch?

Do you run a Community Supported Agriculture operation? If so you’re most likely aware that there’s a lot more talk than action when it comes to local and ethical food. The truth is that there is a fast growing crowd of conscious consumers who want to buy local and ecological food. The catch is that these people are typically busy and they’re used to the convenience of our modern food system. Their ‘want’ doesn’t translate to ‘will’ because getting along to the Farmers Market or joining their local CSA just doesn’t fit into their lifestyles. Let’s face it. People who participate in CSA’s are a rare breed. It takes commitment, community mindedness and a keen awareness of the insanity of the dominant industrial food regime to go out of your way to be part of the solution. If there were more people like you and your customers then we would be living in a better world, but the reality is that although lots of people want to be part of the solution, they’re just not willing to do what it takes.  BUT… what if we could take the solution to them? What if we could make CSA food fit their lifestyle? The more people who buy local food the better off we all are. Systemic change always starts with a small group of ‘out of the box’ thinkers who demonstrate a smarter way. As a CSA operator you’re demonstrating a smarter way to buy food. The next step is to configure the CSA model to reach more people without taking the simplicity away from your daily operations. This is where Ooooby...
Why 52% of fresh food produce is wasted and how can we change our food system

Why 52% of fresh food produce is wasted and how can we change our food system

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall is on a rampage to expose the ridiculous levels of food waste caused by our modern food systems. Hugh’s War on Waste programme on BBC tells the story of a Norfolk veg farmers who were forced to discard 40% of their harvest because they were too long, too short or just wonky which equates to approximately 20 tonnes of parsnips each week. The percentage of food going to waste has been steadily increasing over the last 40 years and is now reaching ludicrous proportions. This is clearly unsustainable and begs the question ‘what can we do to reverse this trend?’ Our current food waste numbers It’s estimated that around 24% of fresh produce is wasted before it reaches the supermarkets, 9% is binned by the supermarkets and another 19% is tossed before it reaches our forks resulting in less than half  getting into our bellies.* The diagram above shows that the largest proportion of waste (24%) comes from farmers growing more than the supermarkets buy.  They do this for two reasons; the supermarket sales model is based on visual merchandising which means that they only want cosmetically beautiful food forcing the farmer to cull anything that isn’t picture book perfect, and the supermarket supply chain requires food to be in transit and sit on shelves for a long time, so even the smallest blemishes need to be eliminated in case they spread over time and betray the lack of freshness of the whole batch. The remaining part of supply chain waste (9%) comes from food that is left on the shelf.  This is the result of merchandising psychology....